Lincoln Rock Light, Clarence Strait

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Lincoln Rock Light, Clarence Strait

by | Sep 2, 2020

Lincoln Rock and Lincoln Island are small islets in Clarence Strait in Southeast Alaska, about 63 miles (102 km) northwest of Ketchikan and 31 miles (50 km) southwest of Wrangell, Alaska. The islets are part of the Abraham Islands just off the west coast of Etolin Island. They were named in 1886 by Lieutenant Commander A.S. Snow of the U.S. Navy for Abraham Lincoln, the 16th President of the United States.

A lighthouse was contracted to be built on Lincoln Rock in March 1902, but due to problems with weather and use of substandard materials, construction was not completed until late 1903. The station was plagued by bad weather and part of the landing platform was carried away by high seas. The station was damaged repeatedly in November 1909 and again in April of 1910 by severe storms. After establishing a temporary light, the keepers evacuated Lincoln Rock in December of 1910. 

In 1911, funds were appropriated to construct a manned fog signal station on the larger grass-covered Lincoln Island about 1300 feet (400 m) east of Lincoln Rock. Construction of this new station was completed on October 10, 1911, and in 1944 a skeletal light tower was added. The Lincoln Island station was decommissioned and demolished in 1968 and today only the building foundations remain. A modern light mounted on a steel skeleton tower is currently active on Lincoln Rock. Read more here and here. Explore more of Lincoln Rock Light here:

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