Rivers

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Recent Articles

Bering River, Controller Bay

Bering River starts at the terminus of the Bering Glacier and flows southwest about 20 miles (32 km) to Controller Bay, about 63 miles (102 km) west of Cape Yakutaga and 58 miles (94 km) southeast of Cordova, Alaska.

Peacock Spit, Columbia River Bar

Peacock Spit is the northern portion of a mostly submerged sand bar at the mouth of the Columbia River, about 12 miles (19 km) northwest of Astoria and 2.5 miles (4 km) south of Ilwaco, Washington.

Ten Mile River Estuary, MacKerricher State Park

Ten Mile River is a stream located about 10 miles (16 km) north of the Noyo River at Fort Bragg and 5.7 miles (9.2 km) south of Westport, California.

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Old Karluk Village, Kodiak Island

Old Karluk Village, Kodiak Island

Karluk is a small historical fishing community located at the mouth of the Karluk River on the west coast of Kodiak Island, about 88 air miles (142 km) southwest of Kodiak and 301 miles (485 km) southwest of Anchorage, Alaska. 

Dangerous River, Brabazon Mountains

Dangerous River, Brabazon Mountains

Dangerous River starts at Harlequin Lake and flows southwest for 16 miles (26 km) to the Gulf of Alaska, about 102 miles (165 km) northwest of Gustavus and 50 miles (81 km) southeast of Yakutat, Alaska.

Cape Disappointment Light, Columbia River

Cape Disappointment Light, Columbia River

Cape Disappointment is a prominent headland and landmark on the north side of the Columbia River, 12 miles (19 km) northwest of Astoria and 2.2 miles (3.5 km) south of Ilwaco, Washington.

Red River Chert, Kodiak Island

Red River Chert, Kodiak Island

The Red River is a stream on Kodiak Island that flows south for about 4.5 miles (7 km) to Shelikof Strait, 2 miles (3.2 km) east of Bumble Bay, and about 80 miles (129 km) southwest of Kodiak and 6 miles (10 km) northwest of Ayakulik, Alaska.

Kasilof River, Kenai Peninsula

Kasilof River, Kenai Peninsula

Kasilof River starts at the outlet of Tustumena Lake on the Kenai Peninsula and flows northwest for 17 miles (27 km) to Cook Inlet, about 51 miles (82 km) north-northeast of Homer and 13 miles (21 km) south-southwest of Kenai, Alaska.

Mad River, McKinleyville

Mad River, McKinleyville

The Mad River starts in the Coast Range and flows generally northwest for 113 miles (182 km), draining a watershed of 12,872,240 acres (128,722 ha), and enters the Pacific Ocean about 12 miles (19 km) north of Eureka and 1.8 miles (3 km) northwest of McKinleyville, California.

Bering River, Controller Bay

Bering River, Controller Bay

Bering River starts at the terminus of the Bering Glacier and flows southwest about 20 miles (32 km) to Controller Bay, about 63 miles (102 km) west of Cape Yakutaga and 58 miles (94 km) southeast of Cordova, Alaska.

Rabbit Creek, Potter Marsh

Rabbit Creek, Potter Marsh

Rabbit Creek starts at the outlet of Rabbit Lake, at the base of North Suicide Peak in the Chugach Mountains at an elevation of 3,082 feet (940 m), and flows northwest and west for 26 miles (42 km) to Potter Marsh where it merges with Little Rabbit Creek and discharges into Turnagain Arm, about 13 miles (21 km) northwest of Hope and 10 miles (16 km) south-southeast of downtown Anchorage, Alaska.

Swanson River, Captain Cook State Recreation Area

Swanson River, Captain Cook State Recreation Area

Swanson River is a stream on the Kenai Peninsula that flows 40 miles (64 km) from Gene Lake in the Swanson Lakes district to Number Three Bay on the southeastern shore of Cook Inlet, about 47 miles (76 km) southwest of Anchorage and 19 miles (31 km) north-northeast of Kenai, Alaska.

Kupigruak Channel, Colville River

Kupigruak Channel, Colville River

Colville River is formed by Thunder and Storm Creeks in the De Long Mountains of the Brooks Range and flows east-northeast for 350 miles (565 km) to Harrison Bay in the Beaufort Sea, about 52 miles (84 km) west-northwest of Deadhorse and 18 miles (29 km) north-northwest of Nuiqsut, Alaska.

About the background graphic

This ‘warming stripe’ graphic is a visual representation of the change in global temperature from 1850 (top) to 2019 (bottom). Each stripe represents the average global temperature for one year. The average temperature from 1971-2000 is set as the boundary between blue and red. The colour scale goes from -0.7°C to +0.7°C. The data are from the UK Met Office HadCRUT4.6 dataset. 

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